University of Southern California Digital Library > California Historical Society Collection, 1860-1960 > A woman posing next to several yuccas (Yucca whipplei - Spanish Bayonet)

Image / A woman posing next to several yuccas (Yucca whipplei - Spanish Bayonet)

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Title
A woman posing next to several yuccas (Yucca whipplei - Spanish Bayonet)
Publication Information
University of Southern California. Libraries
Contributing Institution
University of Southern California Digital Library
Collection
California Historical Society Collection, 1860-1960
Rights Information
Doheny Memorial Library, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0189
Public Domain. Release under the CC BY Attribution license--http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/--Credit both “University of Southern California. Libraries” and “California Historical Society” as the source. Digitally reproduced by the USC Digital Library; From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California
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Description
Photograph of a woman posing next to several yuccas (Yucca whipplei - Spanish Bayonet), [s.d.]. To the left, the tall shaft and bloom of the Yucca whipplei is shown, nearly three times as tall as the woman to its right. Hills and mountains are visible in the background and in the distance.
"The genus Yucca is one of the most remarkable groups of flowering plants native to the New World. It includes about 40 species, most of which occur in the southwestern United States and Mexico. Although they are often associated with arid desert regions, some species are native to the southeastern United States and the Caribbean islands. What truly sets this genus apart from other flowering plants is their unique method of pollination: A specific moth that is genetically programmed for stuffing a little ball of pollen into the cup-shaped stigma of each flower. Like fig wasps and acacia ants, the relationship is mutually beneficial to both partners, and is vital for the survival of both plant and insect. In fact, yuccas cultivated in the Old World, where yucca moths are absent, will not produce seeds unless they are hand pollinated." -- unknown author.
Type
image
Format
2 photographs : photonegative, photoprint, b&w
10 x 13 cm.
negatives (photographic)
photographic prints
photographs
Identifier
chs-m17566 [Legacy record ID]
CHS-6012
http://doi.org/10.25549/chs-m17566
http://thumbnails.digitallibrary.usc.edu/CHS-6012.jpg
Subject
Botany--Flowers
Botany--Joshua Tree (Yucca)
Flowers
Deserts
Place
USA
Source
1-77-68 [Microfiche number]
6012 [Accession number]
CHS-6012 [Call number]
California Historical Society [Contributing entity]
Relation
California Historical Society Collection, 1860-1960
Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960
chs-m265

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