UC Riverside, California Museum of Photography > Keystone-Mast Collection > NORTH ON BROADWAY PAST TRINITY CHURCH - What would be the feelings of doughty old Peter Minuit, who purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for $24, if he were to take a stroll to-day down this Broadway canyon along which runs these piles of brick and stone whose value runs into the hundreds of millions and whose population is that of large cities? The Equitable Building alone, which is the second to our right, houses 15,000 tenants and employees, and the Woolworth, a part of whose tower we see to the left, has a working-day population of 12,000. A part of the Singer Tower is also in view to the left. Trinity Church is perhaps the wealthiest in the world. The ground on which it stands is now worth a fabulous sum, yet business pressure does not attempt to remove this old edifice which still stands as a monument to man's faith in and aspiration for something more than the merely material. There has been a church on this site since 1695, although the present building was built in 1839. To our right, opposite Trinity Church, is Wall Street, short, narrow and in no way impressive in appearance, yet one of the most influential streets in the world. From here gigantic projects, national and international, are financed and sums almost inconceivable in volume are exchanged daily. Broadway is a part of the old Albany post road. About five miles to the north of this point touches Times Square, and still farther on, Columbus Circle. That section of Broadway is the glittering Great White Way, the amusement center of the city. While lower Broadway has a day population only, upper Broadway draws its throngs at night. More than 100,000 are accommodated nightly in theaters and places of amusement

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Title
NORTH ON BROADWAY PAST TRINITY CHURCH - What would be the feelings of doughty old Peter Minuit, who purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for $24, if he were to take a stroll to-day down this Broadway canyon along which runs these piles of brick and stone whose value runs into the hundreds of millions and whose population is that of large cities? The Equitable Building alone, which is the second to our right, houses 15,000 tenants and employees, and the Woolworth, a part of whose tower we see to the left, has a working-day population of 12,000. A part of the Singer Tower is also in view to the left. Trinity Church is perhaps the wealthiest in the world. The ground on which it stands is now worth a fabulous sum, yet business pressure does not attempt to remove this old edifice which still stands as a monument to man's faith in and aspiration for something more than the merely material. There has been a church on this site since 1695, although the present building was built in 1839. To our right, opposite Trinity Church, is Wall Street, short, narrow and in no way impressive in appearance, yet one of the most influential streets in the world. From here gigantic projects, national and international, are financed and sums almost inconceivable in volume are exchanged daily. Broadway is a part of the old Albany post road. About five miles to the north of this point touches Times Square, and still farther on, Columbus Circle. That section of Broadway is the glittering Great White Way, the amusement center of the city. While lower Broadway has a day population only, upper Broadway draws its throngs at night. More than 100,000 are accommodated nightly in theaters and places of amusement
Creator
Not Known
Contributor
Gifford M. Mast
Date Created and/or Issued
[Date not indicated]
Publication Information
Keystone View Company
Contributing Institution
UC Riverside, California Museum of Photography
Collection
Keystone-Mast Collection
Rights Information
REQUIRED CREDIT LINE MUST STATE: Keystone-Mast Collection, UCR/California Museum of Photography, University of California at Riverside. Please contact UCR/California Museum of Photography for information about the copyright status of this item. Some materials in these collections may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). In addition, the reproduction, and/or commercial use, of some materials may be restricted by gift or purchase agreements, donor restrictions, privacy and publicity rights, licensing agreement(s), and/or trademark rights. Distribution or reproduction of materials protected by copyright beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. To the extent other restrictions apply, permission for distribution or reproduction from the applicable rights holder is also required. Responsibility for obtaining permissions, and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Description
NORTH ON BROADWAY PAST TRINITY CHURCH - What would be the feelings of doughty old Peter Minuit, who purchased Manhattan Island from the Indians for $24, if he were to take a stroll to-day down this Broadway canyon along which runs these piles of brick and stone whose value runs into the hundreds of millions and whose population is that of large cities? The Equitable Building alone, which is the second to our right, houses 15,000 tenants and employees, and the Woolworth, a part of whose tower we see to the left, has a working-day population of 12,000. A part of the Singer Tower is also in view to the left. Trinity Church is perhaps the wealthiest in the world. The ground on which it stands is now worth a fabulous sum, yet business pressure does not attempt to remove this old edifice which still stands as a monument to man's faith in and aspiration for something more than the merely material. There has been a church on this site since 1695, although the present building was built in 1839. To our right, opposite Trinity Church, is Wall Street, short, narrow and in no way impressive in appearance, yet one of the most influential streets in the world. From here gigantic projects, national and international, are financed and sums almost inconceivable in volume are exchanged daily. Broadway is a part of the old Albany post road. About five miles to the north of this point touches Times Square, and still farther on, Columbus Circle. That section of Broadway is the glittering Great White Way, the amusement center of the city. While lower Broadway has a day population only, upper Broadway draws its throngs at night. More than 100,000 are accommodated nightly in theaters and places of amusement.
Type
image
Format
Keystone photo print 7.18 in. x 4.18 in.
Identifier
http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt087011vn
1996.0009.T23155
Language
English
Subject
Cityscapes
Skyscrapers
Place
North and Central America
United States
New York

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