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Title
Cuba - Province of Oriente - Santiago De Cuba: The channel waters of the entrance to Santiago harbor now the scene of seashore fun and frolic was once the screen of naval maneuvering by both Spanish and American fleets in the days of 1898 during the Spanish-American War. The little hilly islands had no fine homes or swimming clubs or casinos. In the water just between the two islands in the foreground the Merrimac sank. Lt. Hobson, under orders, sank the ship which was a collier but it was planned to have her go down closer to the mouth of the channel instead of inside. Shells from the Spaniards damaged the Merrimac so that she could not be steered into the proper position, sinking before this could be accomplished. The Spanish flotilla, in the channel behind the hill island slipped out thro [through] the channel around the point of the island at the center back of the picture, by passing the Merrimac and slipping out to the open sea under cover of darkness on July 3, 1898, one month after the Merrimac had gone down. As Cervera got his ships out of the harbor, He ordered the Mercedes sunk in an effort to keep the Americans out of the harbor, but because of American shells, his ship-sinking did no better than the Americans in the matter of placing. The Spaniards were overhauled by the Americans outside the harbor mouth and their ships shelled, setting fire to the wooden decks which caused the Spaniards to beach the ships and abandon them in order to save their men who were subsequently taken prisoners by Cuban force near by
Creator
James C. Sawders
Contributor
Gifford M. Mast
Date Created and/or Issued
1948
Publication Information
Keystone View Company
Contributing Institution
UC Riverside, California Museum of Photography
Collection
Keystone-Mast Collection
Rights Information
REQUIRED CREDIT LINE MUST STATE: Keystone-Mast Collection, UCR/California Museum of Photography, University of California at Riverside. Please contact UCR/California Museum of Photography for information about the copyright status of this item. Some materials in these collections may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). In addition, the reproduction, and/or commercial use, of some materials may be restricted by gift or purchase agreements, donor restrictions, privacy and publicity rights, licensing agreement(s), and/or trademark rights. Distribution or reproduction of materials protected by copyright beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. To the extent other restrictions apply, permission for distribution or reproduction from the applicable rights holder is also required. Responsibility for obtaining permissions, and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Description
Cuba - Province of Oriente - Santiago De Cuba: The channel waters of the entrance to Santiago harbor now the scene of seashore fun and frolic was once the screen of naval maneuvering by both Spanish and American fleets in the days of 1898 during the Spanish-American War. The little hilly islands had no fine homes or swimming clubs or casinos. In the water just between the two islands in the foreground the Merrimac sank. Lt. Hobson, under orders, sank the ship which was a collier but it was planned to have her go down closer to the mouth of the channel instead of inside. Shells from the Spaniards damaged the Merrimac so that she could not be steered into the proper position, sinking before this could be accomplished. The Spanish flotilla, in the channel behind the hill island slipped out thro [through] the channel around the point of the island at the center back of the picture, by passing the Merrimac and slipping out to the open sea under cover of darkness on July 3, 1898, one month after the Merrimac had gone down. As Cervera got his ships out of the harbor, He ordered the Mercedes sunk in an effort to keep the Americans out of the harbor, but because of American shells, his ship-sinking did no better than the Americans in the matter of placing. The Spaniards were overhauled by the Americans outside the harbor mouth and their ships shelled, setting fire to the wooden decks which caused the Spaniards to beach the ships and abandon them in order to save their men who were subsequently taken prisoners by Cuban force near by.
Type
image
Format
Keystone photo print 7.18 in. x 4.18 in.
Identifier
http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt1w1014q8
1996.0009.KU104134.SS
Language
English
Subject
Nature
Bodies of water
Harbors
Land
Hills
Dwellings
Houses
Sites
Historic sites
Battlefields
Place
North and Central America
Cuba
Santiago de Cuba
Oriente
Latitude: 21 30 N
Longitude: 080 00 W

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