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Title
Data from: Orthographic and phonological preview benefits: Parafoveal processing in skilled and less-skilled deaf readers
Creator
Belanger, Nathalie N
Mayberry, Rachel I
Date Created and/or Issued
2013
Contributing Institution
UC San Diego, Library, Research Data Curation Program
Collection
Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection
Rights Information
Under copyright
Constraint(s) on Use: This work is protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). Use of this work beyond that allowed by "fair use" requires written permission of the UC Regents. Responsibility for obtaining permissions and any use and distribution of this work rests exclusively with the user and not the UC San Diego Library. Inquiries can be made to the UC San Diego Library program having custody of the work.
Use: This work is available from the UC San Diego Library. This digital copy of the work is intended to support research, teaching, and private study.
Rights Holder and Contact
UC Regents
Description
Publication abstract: Many deaf individuals do not develop the high-level reading skills that will allow them to fully take part into society. To attempt to explain this widespread difficulty in the deaf population, much research has honed in on the use of phonological codes during reading. The hypothesis that the use of phonological codes is associated with good reading skills in deaf readers, though not well supported, still lingers in the literature. We investigated skilled and less-skilled adult deaf readers’ processing of orthographic and phonological codes in parafoveal vision during reading by monitoring their eye movements and using the boundary paradigm. Orthographic preview benefits were found in early measures of reading for skilled hearing, skilled deaf, and less-skilled deaf readers, but only skilled hearing readers processed phonological codes in parafoveal vision. Crucially, skilled and less-skilled deaf readers showed a very similar pattern of preview benefits during reading. These results support the notion that reading difficulties in deaf adults are not linked to their failure to activate phonological codes during reading. Subject population: Adults, deaf, bilingual
Research Data Curation Program, UC San Diego, La Jolla, 92093-0175 (https://library.ucsd.edu/research-and-collections/data-curation/)
Belanger, Nathalie N; Mayberry, Rachel I; Rayner, Keith (2016): Data from: Orthographic and phonological preview benefits: Parafoveal processing in skilled and less-skilled deaf readers. In Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection. UC San Diego Library Digital Collections. http://doi.org/10.6075/J0B8562K
Belanger, N.N., Mayberry, R.I., & Rayner, K. (2013). Orthographic and phonological preview benefits: Parafoveal processing in skilled and less-skilled deaf readers. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66, 2237-2252. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2013.780085
This package contains data and data processing information for a gaze-contingent invisible boundary paradigm experiment. The ASC and DA3 files contain data from two separate (published experiments). The items for this experiment are numbered 129-200 and the conditions are the following: Condition #2 (identical; board-board), Condition #3 (homophone; bored-board), Condition #4 (orthographically similar and phonologically dissimilar; beard-board), Condition #5 (unrelated; tight-board). Importantly, in this experiment, there was also a relative frequency manipulation where the preview word was of lower frequency than the target (LFHF) or vice-versa (HFLF). Items 129-164 are LFHF, and items 165-200 are HFLF. All items in Condition #1 belong to another experiment "Highdeaf_Predictability", also available in the repository. See description of the items for this later experiment in related data package. See the Guide (Related Resource link, below) for details on some of the different types of files and column definitions that are contained in the data collection. Direct any inquiry to mattjabbott@gmail.com. Subject characteristics: Skilled Hearing Readers (SKH) All DA1 files beginning with the letter "H" = hearing adults, native speakers of English, age 21-43 years (M = 29), mean reading level = 11th grade Subject characteristics: Skilled Hearing Readers (SKH) All DA3 files beginning with the letter "H" = hearing adults, native speakers of English, age 21-43 years (M = 29), mean reading level = 11th grade Skilled Deaf Readers (SKD) Main communication mode is American Sign Language, learned before 10 years old, age 20-45 years (M = 30), mean reading level = 10th grade DA3 files for SKD - All DA3 files containing the following codes are for the SKD readers: D02, D03, D04, D05, D08, D09, D12, D13, D14, D15, D17, D18, D19, D21, D23, D25, D26, D31 (see list of .DA3 files in "ALLDA3.lst") Less-Skilled Deaf Readers (LSKD) Main communication mode is American Sign Language, learned before 10 years old, age 20-45 years (M = 30), mean reading level = 6th grade DA3 files for LSKD - All DA3 files containing the following codes are for the LSKD readers: D01, D06, D07, D10, D11, D16, D22, D24, D27, D28, D29, D30, D32, D33, D34, D35, D36, D37, D38, D39, D40, D41 (see list of .DA3 files in "ALLDA3.lst")
Type
Dataset
Language
English
Subject
Eye-tracking
Preview benefit
Reading
Reading ability
Parafoveal processing
Phonological preview
Psychology
Research data
Orthographic preview
Gaze-contingent display change
Eye movements

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