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Dataset / Data from: Eye Movements While Reading Biased Homographs: Effects of Prior Encounter ...

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Title
Data from: Eye Movements While Reading Biased Homographs: Effects of Prior Encounter and Biasing Context on Reducing the Subordinate Bias Effect
Creator
Leinenger, Mallorie
Date Created and/or Issued
2013
Contributing Institution
UC San Diego, Library, Research Data Curation Program
Collection
Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection
Rights Information
Under copyright
Constraint(s) on Use: This work is protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). Use of this work beyond that allowed by "fair use" requires written permission of the UC Regents. Responsibility for obtaining permissions and any use and distribution of this work rests exclusively with the user and not the UC San Diego Library. Inquiries can be made to the UC San Diego Library program having custody of the work.
Use: This work is available from the UC San Diego Library. This digital copy of the work is intended to support research, teaching, and private study.
Rights Holder and Contact
UC Regents
Description
Publication abstract: Readers experience processing difficulties when reading biased homographs preceded by subordinate-biasing contexts. Attempts to overcome this processing deficit have often failed to reduce the subordinate bias effect (SBE). In the present studies, we examined the processing of biased homographs preceded by single-sentence subordinately-biasing contexts, and varied whether this preceding context contained a prior instance of the homograph or a control word/phrase. Having previously encountered the homograph earlier in the sentence reduced the SBE for the subsequent encounter, whereas simply instantiating the subordinate meaning produced processing difficulty. We compared these reductions in reading times to differences in processing time between dominant-biased repeated and nonrepeated conditions in order to verify that the reductions observed in the subordinate cases did not simply reflect a general repetition benefit. Our results indicate that a strong, subordinate-biasing context can interact during lexical access to overcome the activation from meaning frequency and reduce the SBE during reading. Subject population: Adults
Research Data Curation Program, UC San Diego, La Jolla, 92093-0175 (https://library.ucsd.edu/research-and-collections/data-curation/)
Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith (2015): Data from: Eye movements while reading biased homographs: Effects of prior encounter and biasing context on reducing the subordinate bias effect. In Keith Rayner Eye Movements in Reading Data Collection. UC San Diego Library Digital Collections. http://dx.doi.org/10.6075/J0D798BS
Leinenger, M., & Rayner, K. (2013). Eye movements while reading biased homographs: Effects of prior encounter and biasing context on reducing the subordinate bias effect. Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 25, 665-681. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/20445911.2013.806513
This package contains data files, processing files, and analysis scripts for two regular reading experiments. The raw data from each experiment are available in ASC (text) format in the "ASC" sub-directories. The input parameter files and scripts used to process the data are available in the "Processing" sub-directories. Interim files are in the "DA1" sub-directories. Processed data files (one row for each item X subject combination) from EyeDry are available in the "IXS" sub-directories. Gaze Duration = "GZD.IXS", Total Time = "TVT.IXS", Go-past Time = "GPD.IXS" Regression out probability = "REGOUT.IXS", probability of first pass fixation = "PFIX.IXS." See the Guide (Related Resource link, below) for details on some of the different types of files and column definitions that are contained in the data collection. See the Guide (Related Resource link, below) for details on some of the different types of files and column definitions that are contained in the data collection.
Type
Dataset
Language
English
Subject
Eye movements
Psychology
Eye-tracking
Lexical ambiguity
Reading
Single line
Sentence context

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