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Moving Image / Man in the sea: the story of Sealab II

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Title
Man in the sea: the story of Sealab II
Alternative Title
Story of Sealab II
Creator
US Navy, Bureau of Naval Weapons
Date Created and/or Issued
1966
Contributing Institution
UC San Diego, Library, Special Collections and Archives
Collection
California Revealed from University of California, San Diego, Library
Rights Information
Public domain. No restrictions on use.
Description
This film relates in detail the main objectives of SEALAB II. It includes footage of many activities associated with the SEALAB II experiment. It asks how many men can live for how long under the sea and to what depths man can function under the ocean. It asks what the limits are to human habitation in the sea. Two teams of men work for fifteen consecutive days inside the SEALAB II structure 205 feet deep, one mile off La Jolla, California. Astronaut Scott Carpenter, SEALAB II team commander, remains under water in the habitat for the full duration of the project, 32 consecutive days. This film provides an interesting account of the SEALAB II experiment with advanced knowledge of physiological factors governing prolonged human underwater living conditions.
Type
moving image
Format
Original
Color
Sound
16mm film
Extent
1 Reel of 1
Identifier
93-02
cus_00001
Language
English
Relation
US Navy Bureau of Naval Weapons Film, 1966
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/search?query=US Navy Bureau of Naval Weapons Film, 1966;idT=4b8ac1a1b0e06e5309c538135aea99bc
Provenance
University of California, San Diego Libraries
California Revealed is supported by the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered in California by the State Librarian.

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