California State University, Dominguez Hills, Archives and Special Collections > CSU Japanese American Digitization Project > Memo from Harry L. Black, Advisory Committee, to Mr. [Raymond R.] Best, February 8, 1944

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Title
Memo from Harry L. Black, Advisory Committee, to Mr. [Raymond R.] Best, February 8, 1944
Creator
Black, Harry L.: author
Date Created and/or Issued
1944-02-08
Contributing Institution
California State University, Dominguez Hills, Archives and Special Collections
Collection
CSU Japanese American Digitization Project
Rights Information
Copyright has not been assigned to the San Jose State University Library Special Collections and Archives. This item is available for educational, non-commercial purposes. Please contact San Jose State University for publication information.
Description
Memorandum regarding meeting with Co-ordinating Committee. Concerns meeting to discuss Committee's recommendation to release "18 additional detainees from the stockade." The memo on "Executive Office of the President, Office for Emergency Management" letterhead, also discusses employment of incarcerees from Manzanar and Tule Lake and moving incarcerees out of and into various housing blocks.
2 pages, typescript
The Willard Schmidt collection, documents some of the administrative duties of Willard Schmidt, the Chief of Internal Security for the War Relocation Authority and the Tule Lake incarceration/segregation camp. This collection contains administrative records and photos documenting the Tule Lake camp, the largest incarceration camp with a peak population of 18,789 and with the most turbulent history. In 1943, the camp was turned into a segregation center to house "disloyal" Japanese Americans relocated from other camps based on their answers to a confusing loyalty questionnaire. The camp endured martial law from November 1943- Jan 1944 after escalating protests and unrest. The hostile environment of the camp lead to many incarcerees renouncing their American citizenship upon the end of incarceration, a process which took 14 years to reverse if they did not wish to be deported to Japan.
Batch4_20171108rev; grant_002
Type
text
Format
application/pdf
Identifier
sjs_sch_0091
http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/6133
Language
English
Subject
World War II--Incarceration camps--Conflicts, intimidation, and violence
World War II--Incarceration camps--Incarcerees
World War II--Incarceration camps--Work and jobs
World War II--Incarceration camps--Housing--Barracks
World War II--Incarceration camps--Conflicts, intimidation, and violence--Tule Lake strike
Place
Newell, California
Incarceration Camps--Tule Lake
Source
San Jose State University Department of Special Collections and Archives;
Relation
California State University Japanese American Digitization Project
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt0j49q761/
Schmidt (Willard E.) Papers

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