Loyola Marymount University, Department of Archives and Special Collections, William H. Hannon Library > America's West > Occupation of the Alabama Gates, Los Angeles Aqueduct, Owens Valley, California

Image / Occupation of the Alabama Gates, Los Angeles Aqueduct, Owens Valley, California

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Title
Occupation of the Alabama Gates, Los Angeles Aqueduct, Owens Valley, California
Creator
Detrick Studio (Bishop, Calif.)
Date Created and/or Issued
1924
Publication Information
Center for the Study of Los Angeles Research Collection, Loyola Marymount University
Contributing Institution
Loyola Marymount University, Department of Archives and Special Collections, William H. Hannon Library
Collection
America's West
Rights Information
Materials in the Department of Archives and Special Collections may be subject to copyright. Unless explicitly stated otherwise, Loyola Marymount University does not claim ownership of the copyright of any materials in its collections. Please refer to: http://library.lmu.edu/generalinformation/departments/digitallibraryprogram/copyrightandreproductionpolicy/
Description
Group of ranchers holding the Alabama Gates of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Photographer's inscription in lower middle of photograph: "Bishop Ranchers in Possession of LA Water Supply Nov. 16-20, 1924." Title supplied by cataloger.
To meet the need for water of its growing population, the City of Los Angeles began buying land and corresponding water rights in the Owens Valley in 1905. In 1913, the great Los Angeles Aqueduct was completed to bring Owens Valley water to the city. In 1923, the City of Los Angeles began acquiring more land in the Owens Valley to gain further sources of water. To protest the failure of Los Angeles to address their grievances, Owens Valley farmers and ranchers, under the leadership of Bishop, California banker Mark Watterson, seized the Alabama Gates, on 16 November 1924. The Gates divert water to a spillway allowing water to flow to the lower Owens River, which leads to the now dry Owens Lake. During the occupation water was let from the aqueduct into the Owens River bed, at that time dry (it has now been partially restored). After townspeople from Bishop joined the occupation, the number of occupiers reached seven hundred. It lasted until 20 November, and brought both national and international press coverage to the plight of the Owens Valley residents. The occupation and resulting favorable publicity did nothing to halt the City of Los Angeles' continued acquisition and subsequent control of land in the valley. The famous Alabama Hills, the site of many a western movie, are in the background.
Type
image
Format
1 postcard : b&w ; 8 x 13 cm
Identifier
ov051
J. D. Black Papers, CSLA-15, Series 3: Photographs, Subseries A: Photographic Postcards, Box 16, Sleeve 2
http://digitalcollections.lmu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/jdblack/id/66
Language
English
Subject
Los Angeles Department of Water and Power
Los Angeles Aqueduct (Calif.)
Owens Valley (Calif.)
Owens River (Calif.)--Water rights
Bishop (Calif.)
Water rights--California--Owens Valley
Water rights--California--Los Angeles
Canals--California--Owens Valley
Protest movements--California--Owens Valley
Relation
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt3w1022nb
http://digitalcollections.lmu.edu/

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