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Image / Recumbent Buddha statue: Soles of the Buddha's feet: Buddhapāda

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Title
Recumbent Buddha statue: Soles of the Buddha's feet: Buddhapāda
Creator
de Silva, Preethi
Date Created and/or Issued
1999
Publication Information
Claremont Colleges Library
Contributing Institution
Claremont Colleges Library
Collection
Ancient Cultural Sites and Royal Residences
Rights Information
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License - http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Description
The soles of the feet of the recumbent Buddha are painted in a traditional manner, with circular lotus designs. The Buddhapāda (Buddha's footprint, i.e., the feet sculpted in low relief on stone) were some of the earliest artworks associated with the Buddha and evolving from aniconic to iconic (anthropomorphic) representations of the Buddha used for purposes of veneration. The practice originated in India. Later, recumbent statues of the Buddha included painted soles of the feet, depicting as here, various designs of the lotus flower, which resemble the Dhammachakra wheel representing the turning of the 'Wheel of the law, ' the teachings of the Buddha; other designs also included the symbolic 32, 108 or 132 auspicious characteristics of the Buddha. While many other symbols, too, were depicted on the soles of the feet, in Sri Lanka mainly the Dhammachakra wheel is found after circa the 8th century.
Type
image
Format
image/tiff
Identifier
acs00297.tif
http://ccdl.claremont.edu/cdm/ref/collection/p15831coll15/id/387
Subject
Buddha
Statues
Time Period
1st century BCE, and later
Place
Sässēruwa (Räs vehera)
North Central province, 11 km west of Avukana (location of famous Buddha statue).
Sri Lanka
Relation
Ancient Buddhist Sites and Royal Residences in Sri Lanka - https://ccdl.claremont.edu/digital/collection/p15831coll15

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